The potato: A nexus agent in the service of resilience

In development work, the potato is perhaps a difficult sell when one humanitarian crisis after another calls for the world's attention and support. But in North Korea, the little yellow-gray screech is bursting with transformative power: it paves the way for less dependence on humanitarian aid.

Mission East opens a new office in DPRK

Mission East operates as the only Danish relief organization in DPRK. The organization now opens its own office in the country to be able to follow developments closely, respond quickly to needs - and to be able to continuously monitor projects and develop new ones with local authorities and international players

Sale of paper figures benefits North Korea’s most vulnerable

Annelise Würtz spends her winters creating beautiful and refined figures out of paper strips. She donates part of the profit to Mission East’s work among malnourished families in North Korea.

”I have always been impressed by Mission East’s work,” Annelise Würtz says when asked why she chose to support Mission East’s work, when she back in 2016 with great enthusiasm began creating and selling paper strip figures – the so-called quilling figures.  

Effective aid can prevent a looming food crisis in North Korea

This summer’s heatwave in North Korea has dried out the maize harvest and made the undernourished population even more dependent on outside help, the managing director of Mission East concludes after visiting the country. Mission East secures the water supply and makes agriculture more efficient.

A new, serious food crisis is looming in North Korea. This summer’s heatwave brought temperatures of up to 40 degrees for a whole month and dried out the country’s maize fields. The harvest is expected to be reduced by 30 per cent.

Clean water and better nutrition for North Korean families

Mission East is helping North Korean families protect themselves against contagious diseases and produce more food – for the benefit of themselves and their environment.

By Line Højland, Communications Officer, Oktober 2017

The inhabitants of Taegok Ri village in the southeastern part of North Korea do not have enough food. That is why they cultivate as much land as they can – in the valley as well as on the surrounding hill slopes. However, their way of farming may have disastrous consequences.

Disaster aid for North Koreans

Heavy floods in North Hamyong province have made thousands of people homeless. Mission East is one of the few international aid organisations in the area and provides clean drinking water and hygiene training so that the local population is not infected by dirty river water.

By Svend Løbner, freelance journalist

Kim Kyong Ok is sitting at the entrance to the tent that she inhabits together with her daughter and son-in-law. She is surrounded by a few modest objects – some cooking gear, a bicycle and a pair of shoes.

Water is heavy when it must be carried

When there is a half hour walk to fetch clean water, you often compromise with proper hygiene. Juyang Hui from North Korea had to walk half an hour twice a day to reach the nearest well and fetch water for her family. The 34-year-old woman lives with her husband and eight-year-old son in the village of Sony outside Kujang.

A question of life or death

Typhoons and floods have caused huge damage in North Korea. By the end of August 2012 Managing Director Kim Hartzner returned from the country that is already struggling to feed it's population.
 
Find the pictures and read his story here:
 
"I came home from an extremely dramatic trip to North Korea by the end of August 2012.

Kim Hartzner: Hungry Children in North Korea

Managing Director Kim Hartzner, has returned from a disturbing trip to North Korea. Read his story here: 

 

"I have just returned from a very dramatic trip to North Korea (July 2012). Even though this year, the supplies of rice from the last harvest have lasted up until June, several store rooms for rice are now empty, and the outlook for the coming months is dark, especially after a period of 2½ months without rain.

Finally Koh receives food - watch the video

More than 27.000 children have now received food from Mission East. 
 
One of the children, who has received food aid, is 2-year old Koh, who lives in an orphanage in Wanson City in the province of Kangwon in North Korea.

New photos from North Korea: Preparing for Food Distribution to Munchon City

Mission East is preparing for its next emergency food distribution in North Korea.
 
Mission East will be distributing maize and a food supplement mixture of essential vitamins, minerals and proteins to over 11,000 young children at 42 kindergartens and 56 nurseries in Munchon City, in the particularly food insecure Kangwon Province, as well as to the provincial paediatric hospital and provincial orphanage.
 

North Korea's road to hunger

How did it happen that about one million people died of starvation in North Korea in the nineties? Can we prevent such a disaster from happening again soon?
 
The nineties were a dark period in North Korean history. The collapse of the Soviet Union and several natural disasters played a role in the famine that killed about one million people.
 
Since the birth of the republic, North Korea has tried to be self-sufficient.

Mission East: ”Reprehensible that the money is not shared out”

The Danish government has decided to send 63 million DKK to the Horn of Africa. Mission East fears that this will affect the North Korean people whose great needs will be given low priority and consequently forgotten.

Terrible photos of malnourished people from the Horn of Africa fill the media these days, there is a great need for help. But the need is great in Asia, too, where two thirds of the world’s poor still live.

EU now sends food aid to North Korea. Listen to Kim Hartzner comment on the development on P1 the 5th of July.

After three years of boycotting relief to North Korea the EU is now sending food aid worth 10 million Euros to this impoverished country.
Mission East's Managing Director, Kim Hartzner, welcomes the aid because of the great need in North Korea. He urges the Danish government to also donate aid to adress the hunger crisis in North Korea.
The government is expected to reach a decision this week. 
 
Listen to the feature from P1 Morgen here. 
(N.B. The feature is in Danish)