| Mission East
Pare Abedillah likes her school’s new colours. Photo: Michael Schmidt
Mission East has hired people who are displaced because of the conflict in Iraq to paint schools in a neighbourhood in Kirkuk. They earn an income, acquire new skills and make the local area look nicer. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Manager, October 2017 Headmistress Pare Abedillah proudly presents her newly painted school. She is a lady of authority with a winning smile, and as headmistress she has decided that her school needed to be painted pink. This makes it stand out from the less colourful surrounding buildings in this poor neighbourhood in the Iraqi city of Kirkuk. “I like that...
For Jamal and his family, receiving a box of food from Mission East was ”like finding a treasure”. Photo: Michael Schmidt
In a village just south of Mosul, the inhabitants are on the edge of starvation and affected by almost three years of occupation by Islamic State. That is why Mission East has distributed food to them – and plans to do more. e By Kim Wiesener, Communications Manager, October 2017 When a Mission East team visited Mahmood for the first time in late August 2017, he was pleasantly surprised about the prospect of receiving aid from an international organisation. He felt that his village had been all but forgotten after being liberated earlier that year. The dignified elderly gentleman with the...
“We consider Mission East a school for Humanity. We have learnt a lot, e.g. working with vulnerable children,” says 27-year old Thamir Alyas, founder of Mission East’s Iraqi partner organisation, Humanity. Photo: Michael Schmidt
It all started when a group of students wanted to make a difference in their war-torn country. Today, Mission East’s partner Humanity has grown into an organisation that helps thousands of Iraqis. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Manager, September 2017 When a couple of yezidi villages in Northern Iraq were attacked by terrorists in 2007, the then 17-year old Thamir Alyas felt that he had to do something for the ethnic-religious minority that he himself belonged to. But his father told him that the best he could do at the time was to educate himself. Thamir took his father’s advice and studied...
Rozh Ahmed during an emergency relief distribution in a village near Mosul. Photo: Mission East
Rozh Ahmed, 25, was the only female member of Mission East’s emergency response team as it started relief distributions in Mosul in late 2016. The experience has been tough and educational for her. By Kim Wiesener, Communication manager, October 2017 If Rozh Ahmed had decided on a secure and predictable course in life, she might have become a university lecturer in her home city of Dohuk in Iraqi Kurdistan. Instead, the bright and well-educated woman has chosen to be in the frontline of Mission East’s relief effort in war-torn Mosul. In late 2016, Rozh entered the eastern part of the Iraqi...
“We know very well that there is war and conflict, and that the human costs are high, especially among civilians. But witnessing this at close hand and seeing how all of Northern Iraq is affected by war – that is a different matter,” Christina Egelund says about her trip to Iraq in March.
Seeing the distress of displaced Iraqi families made a strong impression on Danish parliamentarian Christina Egelund. She witnessed Mission East staff deliver emergency aid near Mosul and Kirkuk with dignity and respect for the displaced families. By Svend Løbner, journalist It is useful for politicians to get a glimpse of reality and meet people who have lost everything and depend completely on humanitarian aid from Denmark. This is how Christina Egelund reflects on her visit to Northern Iraq where she witnessed distributions of emergency relief by Mission East. She is an MP and spokesman on...
Najib thanks Mission East for hygiene kits and kerosene. This helps his large family stay healthy and heat up their homes. Photo: Peter Eilertsen
An emergency relief kit can make a big difference to an Iraqi family. Earlier this year, Najib, an Iraqi father and farmer, returned to his home in the Christian village of Telasquf near Mosul after having been displaced from there for two and a half years. When he met the Managing Director of Mission East, Kim Hartzner, he thanked him for the relief that he and his village had recently received. “I would like to thank you for all the goods that you are distributing. We appreciate it, and we wish that many more people can be helped,” Najib said. He is the father of nine children and escaped...
Emergency relief for the beleaguered population of West Mosul is being loaded on to small trucks from big trucks. Photo: Mission East Iraq
Last year, Mission East was one of the first international organisations to help the population of East Mosul. Since then, the organisation has also been at the forefront of relief efforts for the beleaguered inhabitants in the western part of the city. By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer As the small truck carrying two tons of food came to a halt, Knud Andersen knew that there was little time to waste. The food convoy had entered West Mosul – a far from safe area – and the truck could not remain in its place for long. Otherwise, it would risk becoming a target for fighters from Islamic...
Mission East managing director Kim Hartzner and Danish MP Christina Egelund took part in an aid distribution in the village of Quri Khariban near Mosul. Photo: Peter Eilertsen
Managing Director Kim Hartzner visited Iraq in March together with Christina Egelund, spokesperson on political affairs for one of the governing parties in Denmark, Liberal Alliance. Meeting Mission East beneficiaries made a strong impression on both of them. By Svend Løbner, Journalist, and Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer The villages surrounding the major Iraqi city of Mosul lie in ruins. The devastation caused by the fighting between Iraqi forces and fighters from the terrorist movement Islamic State is so severe that it reminds you of images of the aftermath of World War II. “It...

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