Overcoming - just because you can't see doesn't mean you are fumbling in the dark

Mathias lives in Kirke Hyllinge in Central Zealand with his mother, father and little brother. He has been blind ever since he was almost newborn. Still, he feels like a seeing blind, as he calls it, since he doesn't feel restricted by his visual impairment - something he and his parents have worked on throughout his life:

“There are some things for which I always need help. But I want to make sure there are as many things as I can do myself. My parents and I have done this too. I just want to be as independent and self-reliant as possible. "

 

Falling accident and a goat had lifelong consequences

In Nepal's remote mountainous villages the very young children are at high risk of falling, broken limbs and burns. As medical care is not available, even the smallest accidents can cause lasting disabilities. Unfortunately, Sarita's story is not uncommon in the remote mountainous areas of Nepal. She lives with a physical disability due to an accident she sustained when she was a child when she did not have access to medical care.

Barren surroundings lead to disabilities in children

 

In Nepal, people with disabilities have their everyday lives in the unsettled mountain areas, where they move safely around the outermost slopes. With a camera and a drone, Mission East's Communications Officer Michael Schmidt followed a family man and a schoolgirl's life on a steep hillside to an awareness campaign on people with disabilities.

Bimala was banished to the cowshed

Everyone in Bimala Kafles village was convinced that she and the other women were dangerous during their menstrual period. In Mission East’s youth group, they have discovered that there is nothing to be afraid of. 

Vegetables make children healthy

Pabitra’s daughter did not get enough food when she was a baby and struggles with physical and cognitive difficulties. But in Mission East’s classes for women in Nepal, Pabitra is now learning how to give her children a healthy and nutritious diet. 

Pabitra comes from an extremely poor Dalit family in the remote mountain area of Western Nepal. She got married by the age of 15 and lives with her husband and three children in the village of Thehe. The family lives off the food they manage to grow on their own little piece of land. 

Jhupu manages the village bank

When women learn to count numbers, calculate and save up money, they can fund small businesses and improve their living conditions.

By Susanne Madsen, Fundraiser and Line Højland, Communications Officer – June 2018

In Jhupu Rokaya’s village Murma, the women have a large metal box with three locks on. Jhupu has the key to one of the locks, but to open the box, the keepers of the two other keys must be present too.

From illiteracy to local politics

Lalparu Sunar grew up in a poor family in the remote Karnali region. She was unable to read and write. After her participation in a literacy group for women she had the courage to run for local office - and was elected.

By Asha Budha Magar, Mission East Nepal, September 2017

Nepalese learn how to handle the whims of nature

Mission East aims to enable people in remote communities to respond quickly and effectively when the next disaster strikes.

By Lizz Harrison, Disaster Risk Reduction Programme Manager, Mission East Nepal

Just over two years ago, Nepal was devastated by two major earthquakes hitting within weeks of each other and causing massive destruction. Almost 9,000 people were killed and 20,000 more were injured. 

How do you avoid disasters?

Mission East saves lives in Nepal – now and many years ahead – by training the population to reduce the risk of disasters. Lizz Harrison, an expert in disaster risk reduction, and explains how.

By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer, July 3 2017

When a disaster strikes, it may destroy people’s lives, homes and livelihood. It may also cause a lot of damage to a country’s economy. If the country is poor, it is much more difficult to respond to the disaster, and its development may come to a standstill.

Laxmi had to flee to attend school

The partner organisation of Mission East, HEAD Nepal, locates blind and partially sighted children in remote mountain villages and ensures that they attend school. Laxmi Shahi is one of these children.

By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer

Laxmi Shahi from Nepal’s remote Humla District is partially sighted, but she is doing very well at school. She is one of the best students in her class and aims to become a teacher for other children with disabilities.

”You can never go far enough”

The Mission East Country Director for Nepal realises that it can be expensive to work in the most remote parts of the country. But it is also necessary, he says, given that Mission East aims to reach the most vulnerable.

By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer

When Patrick Sweeting began to visit Nepal’s remote Karnali Region to inspect Mission East projects, he quickly understood that you must go the extra mile to find the most vulnerable people.

The boy Ram now lives in dignity

A blind Nepalese boy was forced to live in a cowshed. Now Ram is flourishing at a home that is run by Mission East’s partner organisation, HEAD Nepal.

By Patrick Sweeting, Mission East Country Director, Nepal

Ram Banadur Shahi, a six-year old boy, was not born blind, but he was born poor. As the youngest son of a poor farmer in the mountainous and arid region of Humla District in western Nepal, he could have expected a hard life, but nobody could have predicted the terrible fate that awaited him.

Nepal 2006: Clean water and disaster awareness are lifesavers

Since 2006, Mission East has worked to develop remote mountain communities in western Nepal. The poverty-stricken population has found new opportunities and hope for the future. A permanent presence in the country also enables Mission East to respond quickly to disaster situations.

By Line Højland, Communications Officer

Chhepi's fields are green again

A project on ”climate-smart” agriculture has created optimism in a village in Western Nepal. With solar-powered water pumps the local farmers can irrigate and cultivate their fields. In December, Mission East’s local partner organisation received an award for the project.

By Kim Wiesener, Communications Officer

"Water and shelter from Mission East saved our lives"

Dalli saw her house crumble when the earthquake struck Nepal last spring. The 44-year-old woman and her children had to sleep in the open until Mission East provided material for shelter and hygiene. Now the work continues to secure the future for other vulnerable families.

Emergency aid to the Himalayas

 

Piskar lies just a few kilometres from the epicentre of the earthquake that hit Nepal on May 12th and the majority of the houses in the village have collapsed. Mission East arrived with humanitarian aid in the form of tarpaulins and hygiene kits shortly before the monsoon set in and mudslides blocked the roads.

‘We need a house to live in’

 

In the aftermath of the Nepal earthquakes, the elderly and people with disabilities are some of the most vulnerable. Man Kaji and Maili Maya are some of the beneficiaries of Mission East’s relief efforts. The rebuilding commences after the monsoon.

Mission East will protect 30,000 victims of earthquake from diseases in monsoon period

Mission East distributes tarpaulins and hygiene kits to about 7,000 families close to the earthquake’s epicenter in Nepal. Volunteers help the most vulnerable putting up tents, and staff advises on hygiene issues.

A month from now massive rain will wash down on the millions people affected by the earthquake in Nepal. The relief and development organisation Mission East is at the moment working tirelessly on providing shelter and clean water for the most vulnerable groups in outlying mountain villages.

Widows must not be forgotten in relief aid

Mission East works on helping the most vulnerable groups in society. Ujjali aged 84 is one of them.

Mission East distributes relief aid in nine villages northeast of Kathmandu and makes sure that the most vulnerable groups in society – e.g. elderly and people with disabilities – get tarpaulins and hygiene kits to withstand cold weather, rain and infectious diseases.

Nepal: breaking the silence

Humla and Mugu are two of the most remote and impoverished districts in Nepal. Humla is only accessible by air and Mugu by just a seasonal road connection. The isolated geography coupled with poverty, low education, poor health, and deep-rooted harmful socio-cultural practices have narrowed opportunities especially for women to lift themselves out of poverty.

Together we break down barriers

Unwanted and hidden, denied access to education and unable to go outside of the four walls of their home. For people with disabilities, there are many barriers to overcome, both physical, as well as barriers that exist in the minds of other people.

In Tajikistan, children with disabilities are hidden away. In Armenia their parents are reproached for having given birth to them. And in Nepal, persons with disabilities are seen as useless in the harsh mountainous areas, where poverty is so great that there is rarely enough food for the whole family.

Food aid on its way to flood victims in Nepal

In India and Nepal, severe flooding has already cost more than a hundred lives, and more people have been reported missing. In Nepal, Mission East is in the process of getting food aid to the victims in the remote mountainous region of Karnali.

 
In recent day, excessive monsoon rains have caused major flooding and landslides in northern India and western Nepal. Amongst other areas, the flooding has hit the region of Karnali in northwestern Nepal where people live in isolated and inaccessible areas.

Women are empowered in Karnali, Nepal

In the remote districts of Karnali, women have important roles and functions in their community. They have responsibilities and heavy workload, but they have little voice to decide for  their own future and the future development of  their village.
 
Usually, boys have priority to  access school, and literacy rate for women is  much lower than for men. Population often believes that women are weak, not so clever and should only focus on home duties. As consequences, women are among the most vulnerable groups living in Karnali.
 

Nepal: Risk-reduction by Radio

If you turn on your radio in the mountain villages of Nepal, you can hear people singing about natural disasters.
 
Songs and radio drama have taught 80,000 villagers in the remote mountain areas of Nepal about floods, mudslides and earthquakes.
 
Each year these disasters destroy harvests, block paths, or in the worst cases, take the lives of residents of these mountainous areas. The short melodic jingles that play on the radio are easy to remember and remind people about good risk-reduction practices.
 

Irrigation brings greater dignity

It is amazing what a few bags of cement can accomplish in the mountains of Nepal. Hear how they have changed the lives of hundreds of people in the impoverished village of Kalika.

Tap stands change lives

For families in the poorest mountain area of Nepal a lot of time is spent fetching water - time that could have been spent in the field working on producing a better yield
40-year-old Indahara's bare feet leave traces in the mud as she walks down the mountain. Here and there mudslides have turned the path into a challenge and it is hard to imagine how she will manage when snow soon starts to fall.

Mission East opens new office in Nepal

Being close to the people we help is part of the vision of Mission East. Our newly-opened office in Nepal will help us taking care of our assistance to the extremely poor population in the mountainous north of the country.
 

Health camp will save lives among 8,000 of Nepal's poorest

Imagine sharing a doctor with 40,000 other people. And imagine having to walk several days on narrow paths across mountains and unsafe bridges to reach him.
 

To many women, children, and men in one of the poorest areas in Nepal, Humla, this is one of the hard facts they have to face every day.

Therefore, Mission East is planning a health camp that will teach the population to take better care of itself when the doctor is several mountains away. And the help is much needed.

Mission East seeks to address urgent needs in Nepal

The decade-long conflict between the government and the Maoists in Nepal appears to be over. In November, the two sides signed a peace agreement. An important way to support the peace process is through providing sustainable solutions to the chronic levels of poverty in many parts of Nepal.