Create a safer future for Iraqi children

The war in Iraq has been brutal. Although peace has slowly returned, the dark reality of war remains in the destroyed buildings and in the minds of Iraqi children and adults. Mission East helps them regain their footing and rebuild the country.

Islamic State took her uncle

When approaching the two-storey building in the ruined city of Mosul, you hear children's voices and laughter. Inside, children and youth aged four to 17 years are in full swing, singing, playing, drawing and learning school subjects. Here we meet 13-year-old Amira.

"I was so scared," she says. "We were surrounded and there was an explosion nearby. We just managed to escape to my uncle's house and from there on to another area. But my uncle was a traffic officer, so Islamic State took him. We still do not know where he is! "

The building houses a centre with a child friendly space established by Mission East in the wake of three years of occupation and a massive bombing of the city. At the centre, Amira and the other children learn school subjects, IT, needlework and to handle difficult emotions. "They teach us to respect each other," she says.

Mission East changes all names of children under 18 years for their safety.

Donate

Give a Christmas present to Amira and her friends at the child friendly spaces in war-torn Iraq!

For 20 EUR a child can get two weeks of training in friendship and coping with difficult emotions.

For 40 EUR a child can get one month's training in hygiene, health and first aid.

For 80 EUR a child can get two months of training in Arabic, English and mathematics.

Read more about how you can donate

 

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Children need schooling

The child friendly space in Mosul is one out of several centres, which Mission East runs together with local partners in war-worn Iraq. The child friendly spaces work as a supplement or substitute for the schooling that many Iraqi children still have to do without and as a place where the children can cope with difficult emotions in a safe environment.

 

Read more about our work in Iraq

 

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